Thursday, September 22, 2016

Guest Bloggers: Ray Chilensky, K.C. Sprayberry, Jim Cronin, Arthur Butt, E.B. Sullivan, Natalie Silk, Rick Ellrod, Debbie De Louise, Rob McLachlan, and S@yr.




The universe is infinite—as are the stories from those who inhabit this wondrous place. Welcome to the many different worlds imagined in the minds of Solstice Publishing authors. What can be more fun than letting your imagination release and enjoying tales from all sorts of cosmoses.


Ten Solstice Publishing authors take you to the dark recesses of the mind, a space station about to be turned upside down by teen investigators, and where reality can
be defined by taking a pill. These stories are just the beginning of a fabulous collection just awaiting the eager reader.
https://youtu.be/VnD061mm2aw



Project 9 Vol 2 features the work of Ray Chilensky, K.C. Sprayberry, Jim Cronin, Arthur Butt, E.B. Sullivan, Natalie Silk, Rick Ellrod, Debbie De Louise, Rob McLachlan, and S@yr.

http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01M0GARAL

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Guest Blogger: Leah Hamrick

Coming Soon!




Please Tell Us About Your Latest Book:
Lyla Hall is like any seventeen-year-old girl. She’s spunky and sweet—and hates being told what to do, even if her disobeying will mean certain death.

When Lyla gets abused by her stepdad for the last time, she’s had enough. She makes a run for the real world—leaving the Summer Solstice, the only place she’s ever known, behind.
Lyla is a Fire Bringer, a person who wields strong fire magic. After discovering a book about her kind in her new schools library, she views the world and everything she’s ever known about herself at a different angle. Lyla learns that she is the owner of a powerful necklace that will cause the end of the world if fallen into the wrong hands. She also learns that she doesn’t have a soul, and that just isn’t cool. She’s determined to get her soul back if it’s the last thing she ever does—even if that means going to Hell to get it.

Then there’s Ethan Killman, the sexy boy from her school that has secrets of his own. They’re instantly falling for each other, and the more time they spend together, the harder those feelings go. Ethan will do anything for Lyla, even laying down his own life to protect her from the enemies that won’t seem to leave them alone.

When the demons find out Lyla is alive, they will stop at nothing to get her necklace and the power it holds, even if they have to go through Ethan to do it.

Lyla and Ethan race against the clock trying to get her soul back before the demons can get her, but what if it’s too late? What if everything they’ve done has been for nothing?


How Much Of Your Personality And Life Experiences Are In Your Writing?
I usually start off a story with things that have happened to me in the past. One’s experiences are their own, so I think it makes a great backdrop for the story. Usually my personality goes into the main character… Sometimes the other characters, it just depends on the mood of the book, and what mood I’m in while typing.


Generally, How Long Does it Take You To Write A Book?
Without any constant interruptions? One-two months, sometimes less. But If I have to keep stopping and starting, I’m looking at maybe three months, but that doesn’t count any of the time I re-read or self-edit. Short Stories I can get done in a few days, it just depends on how long it’s going to be and if the story is fresh in my mind.


Where Do Your Ideas Come From?
My ideas come from my imagination, or things that have happened to me in my life. I grew up in an abusive home with an alcoholic mother and her abusive boyfriends, so I can usually write about stuff like that and not even blink as my fingers fly across the keyboard. I like to keep my feelings bottled up and writing lets me get them out.


Please Tell Us About Yourself.
I’m twenty-two years old, live in Michigan, and my husband and daughters names are Jon, Zoey, and Khloey. I love listening to heavy metal music. You know… the horrible screaming type with awesome guitars and double bass drums. I also like playing the clarinet. I read constantly, and am always thinking up ideas for another story.


Do You Have A Favorite Author? And Why?
Yes, Jennifer Armentrout. Read her books, you will understand why.


What Are You Writing Now?
Well, I’m in the middle of writing the second novel to Frost On My Pillow. It’s called Firestorm In My Soul. I’m also trying to figure out how to finish my novel, Twisted fate. I started this story well over a year ago, and it’s half complete, sitting in a file on my computer. I really need to figure out what I’m doing so I can finish it.


What Are The Essentials Of A Great Romance For You?
I like to see a push and pull kind of thing between the characters. I like those novels when the characters are so caught up in loving each other that they forget about what they are doing. I like a lot of kissing, sparks flying, sexual tension, and I like the characters to be totally committed and love each other with their whole hearts. I don’t like romantic tragedies—and probably never will.


What Is The Most rewarding Thing About Being A Writer?
I would have to say having someone else read my story and love it. There is no better feeling in the world than when someone offers you a contract after months and months of hopeless emails from publishers and impolite emails from agents saying my writing isn’t where it needs to be to get published. Seriously, I just had one the other day from an agent (I sent her a query letter months ago) tell me that I’m a young writer, so therefore no one’s going to buy my stories because no one knows who I am… she said it was too long, and that I needed to invest in an editor. Then she sat there and edited my first five pages to show me what was wrong. I was like, excuse me? LOL


Is There Any Words Of Encouragement For Unpublished Authors?
Keep trying. Keep writing. Go on Query Tracker or Agent Query to find a list of publishers and agents (That’s what I did). Polish your query letters to a T and re-read your story and self-edit until you get sick of reading your own work (Trust me, it happens). Publishers and agents like clean and error-free manuscripts when they read them. No one’s writing is perfect; I still find mistakes after I’ve been through mine (I swear to god) probably a hundred times or more. Make sure you follow the submission guidelines on the websites very carefully, because they look for that stuff, and will usually delete it if there instructions are not met.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Guest Blogger: Raegyn Perry

Lavender Fields (Eternal Journey Book 1) by [Perry, Raegyn]


Please tell us about your latest book. My current published book is my debut novel, Lavender Fields (Book One in the Eternal Journey Series). It’s a romance that’s centered on reincarnation. It is essentially two love stories. It’s about one that doesn’t find its happily ever after, but gets another chance to. Connor Donovan and Greye Fields are two unlikely lovers, in that they each have their own reasons for keeping love at bay. When they find one another, it’s unexpected. When they embrace their love, it’s complicated. When they possibly lose it, it comes down to either chance or choice. Their story is funny, raw, hot and truthful.

What can we expect from you in the future? I’m putting the finishing touches for the sequel, Cypress Groves. This story introduces new and familiar characters, as well as different paranormal aspects.  It’s set in a small Washington town where danger, death and secrets collide with revelations, and of course romance!

How do we find out about you and your books? 
I have two blogs- raegynperry.com and raegynperry.wordpress.com, as well as Facebook (Raegyn Perry, author) and Twitter- @RaegynP. For the books, 

When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms? I think I’ve been a storyteller from childhood, when I would ‘envision’ the make believe worlds I’d introduce to my friends to play in. I started a couple of stories years before Lavender Fields. They are still on ‘Floppy Disks’!! I had sent my manuscript out to several agencies, publishers, and got the ‘Thanks, but no thanks’ responses. At some point, I heard a quote that really resonated at that time with me. I pulled myself up and through joining a writers organization, found the publishing home for my story.

Would you like to write a different genre than you do now, or sub-genre? Yes. After the Eternal Journey Series is finished, I’d like to get cracking on a children’s adventure series. After that, I have a plan for an adult mystery series.

Fill in the blank favorites Dessert.-1) Chocolate fudge cake w/French vanilla ice cream OR Fisher scone strawberry shortcakes.  City.-Paris  Season.- Early Fall. Type of hero.-Tall, dark, compassionate/sensitive, with a hint of being dangerous. Type of heroine.-Strong, smart, complex and flawed.

What are some of your favorite things to do? Outside of writing stories, I love getting lost in a good story. I’m happy when I can immerse myself in a good book, TV show, movie, or even theater play. I also love to dance, whenever I can. Spending time with those I love is high on my list, though I’m a classic introvert.

Which comes first, the story, the characters or the settingIt’s different between Lavender Fields and now Cypress Groves. LF was clearly the idea that morphed into a story that was character driven. For CG, it is the story that comes from the setting and the setting of the back story that is revealed through the characters. That sounds complicated and convoluted even to me! I promise though, it all comes together!

What are the elements of a great romance for you? A great romance should have that first show of interest/intrigue,  a chemical or visceral attraction, conflict, truth, believability, and of course a happily ever after.

Have you experienced writer's block---> If so, how did you work through it?
ALL THE TIME! I work through it by just letting it be sometimes. I don’t let myself get overwhelmed or stressed about it. The words will come, and the story will be fine. If I try and force it, it just creates more stress. Writing should be a joy, a passion. It shouldn’t ever been something that creates turmoil or grief. I’m working a bit through it now with finishing up Cypress Groves.
What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer? For me, it’s the ‘Aha’ moments when an unexpected plot, story or character twist, comes to you. It’s exciting that you’re exploring unknown territory and it’s all unfolding in your own imagination.
If you weren't writing, what would you be doing? I’ve always admired writers that produce or direct the Stage/TV/movie versions of their books, as well as have a cameo appearance in them. (Off the top, one of my favorites- M. Night Shyamalan comes to mind)That’s a world I would love to be a part of. I guess I’d still be writing then! So apparently, if writing isn’t in the equation, I’m lost!
Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers? Go for it. If you have a story to tell, tell it. Tell it NOW. To quote Confucius, ‘We all have two lives. The second begins when we realize we only have the one.’ 

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Guest Blogger: Debbie De Louise



Coming Soon!




Please tell us about your latest book.
BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE is a Cobble Cove Mystery. It’s the sequel to A STONE’S THROW. Although I don’t want to give too much away about it, I can reveal that it takes place in December during the holidays and that there are three crimes and several new characters in addition to some of the ones introduced in the first book. It can be read as a standalone, but some might prefer to read A STONE’S THROW for additional background.

What can we expect from you in the future?
I have already completed a standalone book, SEA SCOPE, that I am still polishing and researching before I start submitting it. This one has a different tone than my previous works. It’s more of a psychological thriller and switches back and forth twenty years to uncover a dangerous secret that four children shared. I also have a great idea for another cozy mystery series, this one involving pets. I’ve already started the first book, but I have no idea when I will have time to work on it because I also want to continue the Cobble Cove mysteries. I’d like to write at least two more and have created outlines for them.

How do we find out about you and your books?
I have a Facebook author page, Twitter page, a newsletter, and a website/blog. Here are the links to those as well as my Amazon and Goodreads author page:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/debbie.delouise.author/ 
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deblibrarian 
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2750133.Debbie_De_Louise 
Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/Debbie-De-Louise/e/B0144ZGXPW/
Website/Blog/Newsletter Sign-Up: https://debbiedelouise.wordpress.com

Why did you decide to write “mystery” novels?
They are the types of books I enjoy reading. However, I don’t consider myself strictly a mystery novelist. My first book was a paranormal romance, and I’ve written short stories in a variety of genres from Romance to Fantasy to Science Fiction.

How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?
A lot. In my Cobble Cove novels, my main character is a librarian, like I am. In my first book and in my recent short story, DEADLINE, that appears in the Solstice anthology, PROJECT 9, I feature a college newspaper editor. When I attended college, I worked on the student newspaper as a features editor. I’ve also included my cats in both my first novel, CLOUDY RAINBOW, and my recent short story, THE PATH TO RAINBOW BRIDGE, in the Solstice anthology, REALMS OF FANTASTIC STORIES.

When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?
I’ve enjoyed writing since I learned how. Before that, I was a big storyteller as a child. Prior to publishing my first manuscript, I wrote articles for my college newspaper and later published articles in pet magazines. I self-published my first novel after briefly trying to sell it to a publisher. I had more luck with my second book that was published by Limitless Publishing. What prompted me to submit my manuscripts for consideration to publishers was the fact that, as a librarian and avid reader, I felt my work was on par or better than those already published. I was motivated by the authors I read and also encouraged by my family and those who read my work.

Generally, how long does it take you to write a book?
I work full-time but am an early riser, so I try to write before work. When I’m working on a novel, I write every day, and it usually takes about two months for me to complete the first draft. The editing usually takes longer, and I also have the manuscript beta read before submitting it for publication.

Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?
If you mean, am I a pantster or a plotter, I am definitely a pantster, but I’ve begun to organize my ideas a bit more. As I said, I usually do most of my writing early – from 5 to 6 a.m. I let the ideas flow and try not to self-edit until I have the whole story, scene, book, etc. complete.

What is your writing routine once you start a book?
I think I already explained that. I write a scene each day from 20 minutes to an hour and a half in the morning.

What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions?
I basically write before they wake up, but my editing bothers them because I read my work out loud – lol. My daughter, who is on the verge of teenage-hood is mostly in her own earphone-plugged in world right now, and my husband is very understanding. When Holly was younger, it was much more difficult, and I did stop writing for a while at that time.

What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?
I make it a point to exercise at least every other day. I love to walk and do walking videos. I also love to spend time with my cats and, lately, I’ve gotten addicted to watching Netflix with my husband, but I make sure to allow time to write, edit, and promote. Since I’m more productive in the morning, I save time at the end of the day to relax with a show. I also try to fit in reading. I don’t read as much as I used to, but I do both for pleasure and for the reviews I write for my library’s monthly staff picks newsletter. Reading also helps me with my writing, as I observe the techniques and styles used by other authors. I like to vary what I read in genre, and I read both popular and lesser-known authors.

What truly motivates you in general? In your writing?
In general, I’m motivated by compliments and encouragement. I’d say the same is true in my writing. I find good reviews and positive comments by readers inspire me and keep me focused on improving the quantity and quality of my output.

Where do your ideas come from?
Everywhere. My life; past and present. The world; news, history. My reading; books, articles.

Do you feel humor is important in mystery and why?
I think humor is important in most writing and even in mystery and crime writing because the reason most people read is to relax and escape. Using some humor to counteract tension in a suspense or mystery novel can be effective especially if the characterizations are strong. I don’t believe I’m a particularly funny person. I’m actually pretty serious in real life, but I find that I can create characters with good senses of humor. For instance, I consider my male characters, John and his father, Mac, in A STONE’S THROW and BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE, to be quirky and funny in some respects. Alicia’s friend, Gilly, can also come up with some humorous lines. I think this adds to the story and is something readers can relate to.

What are your thoughts on love scenes in romance novels, do you find them difficult to write?
I usually include love in my mysteries, but I don’t write explicit sex scenes. It’s not that I’m a prude or I find them hard to write. I just prefer to keep things to the imagination and write more of a cozy mystery which can include love and murder but nothing too sexual or gory. I know there’s an audience for that type of writing, but I feel there’s also an audience for a nice romantic love story within a mystery.

What kind of research do you do?
I’m a librarian, so I use both books and Google to research various facts that I feel would make my books more authentic to readers. I also interview specialists in certain areas who can give me direct answers to my research queries.

Would you like to write a different genre than you do now, or sub-genre?
As I said earlier, I do write different genres, but most of them include a love story within a mystery or vice versa.

What does your husband/wife/boyfriend/girlfriend think of your writing?
My husband supports it. He encourages me to continue because he knows how important it is to me. He’s also helped me at author signings and attended writing conferences with me.

Do you ever ask him/her for advice?
No, not about the details of my plots. I occasionally ask him about computer issues I face when formatting my manuscripts, but he gets a bit frustrated with those questions because I’m not as techy as he is (he’s a computer support person at a college).

Please tell us about yourself (family, hobbies, education, etc.)
I think I mentioned that I’m married and have a daughter. She’ll be 12 in October. I also said that I like to read, walk, and watch TV occasionally. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in English and a Master’s Degree in Library Science and have worked for 25 years as a reference librarian in a public library.

Fill in the blank favorites - Dessert. City. Season. Type of hero. Type of heroine.
Black Forest Cake/dark Chocolate; I’m not a city person, but I live closest to New York City; Handsome/Emotional/intelligent hero; Determined/Loyal/intelligent heroine

What are some of your favorite things to do?
Write, read, walk, cats, travel

Do you have a favorite author? Favorite book?
I enjoy reading a variety of authors and books. I wrote a blog post about some of them that can be read here: http://wp.me/p6m4z7-Bu

Who are some of your other favorite authors to read?
Nora Roberts, Mary Higgins Clark, Sandra Brown, and other romantic suspense authors, although I do like to read other genres and debut books.

What do you think of critique groups in general?
I think they can be helpful if they are moderated properly

Where do you see yourself in five years?
Hopefully, on a bestseller list but, even more importantly, with an agent and a large publisher. I would like to see my books available in a variety of formats to a wide audience.

How long have you been writing - have you always wanted to be a writer?
As I said earlier, I’ve been writing since second grade and have always wanted to be a writer. I put it on the backburner when I became a librarian, but I think my experience in that field has only furthered my interest and credentials.

How many books have you written, how many have been published?
I’ve written at least five books. I completed some others when I was younger, but they are handwritten in notebooks and not on computer. I also have a few partially completed books typed in Word that I want to finish eventually, and many short stories. I currently have two published books with a third coming out soon.

After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever buy it and/or read it?
I bought my last book with Amazon points, but I have not actually sat down to read it completely again. I’ve read parts of all my books, as I read excerpts during authors talks that I give.

Among your own books, have you a favorite book? Favorite hero or heroine?
I don’t want to sound immodest here, but I like all my books and heroes/heroines. I don’t create unlikeable main characters, although some of them have problems, as we all have. However, the manuscript I just completed, Sea Scope, is different than my others and one I believe may be of interest to an agent. I’m taking my time working on it before I submit it anywhere.

What book for you has been the easiest to write? The hardest? The most fun?
They’ve all been about the same challenge to write, but the hardest part has been the editing. I think my first book, the self-published one, CLOUDY RAINBOW, was the most personally fulfilling to me. Although I didn’t sell a lot of copies, the storyline involved the loss of my cat, and there were scenes that went back to my college days. It was all fictionalized, of course, but much of it was based on my own experience.

Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting? What are the elements of a great romance for you?
The characters. I write character-driven books. That doesn’t mean I skimp on plot and setting, but I believe characters are what make a novel. The elements of a great romance are two compatible characters, some tension/obstacles to their relationship, and tender moments.

What is the hardest part of writing/the easiest for you?
One of the hardest parts of writing for me is after I finish the first draft and have to edit/revise my work. It’s very time consuming and not as pleasurable as the initial writing. I also find it difficult to promote my work because it takes away from my writing, but I know it’s necessary. Overall, however, the toughest challenge is finding the time to do everything – write, edit, promote, especially since I also work full-time which most authors do at least in the beginning.
The easiest part for me is the actual writing and the initial ideas. I have so much to write about and so many experiences from which to draw, but this also creates challenges because I need to have time to get all the ideas down.

Have you experienced writer's block---> If so, how did you work through it?
I wouldn’t say I’ve experienced writer’s block, but I did stop writing for a period of time. To get back into it, I took some online courses and began writing short stories and articles before attempting another novel.

What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?
The good reviews and comments from people who’ve read and enjoyed my work. Seeing my book in print is also a great feeling. It’s like having a baby. When you hold that book in your hands the first time and know you created it, it’s absolutely awesome.

If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?
The same as I am now. I’d be working as a librarian, ordering books, and helping people discover new titles and authors.

Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
Not to sound repetitive because this advice is given often, but you really need to be persistent to the point of being stubborn. Don’t give up and don’t stop writing or, if you do, at least go back to it as soon as you can. It’s okay to take a break and to feel hurt by rejection, but realize that overnight success is rare. Even popular authors have faced multiple rejections. It’s not an easy field, but if you love to write and want to share your words with the world, you need to find a way to do that whether it’s through self-publishing, a website/blog, a small press, or with the help of an agent. It’s tough but not Impossible and, although there’s lots of competition today, there’s also many new opportunities.


Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Guest Blogger: Jannette Fuller


Coming Soon!





Please tell us about your latest book.

Transgression is a YA mystery embedded with suspense and a touch of the supernatural. It’s the first book in a series (Ambrosial Acres).

What can we expect from you in the future? The sequel to Transgression (Delusion), followed by the third book to complete the series.

 How do we find out about you and your books?
You can find me by visiting my website--www.jannettefuller.com. I’m always happy to receive visitors, and I do my best to make them feel WELCOMED. Coffee, water, and baked goods will be offered upon entering my domain. All virtual, of course. :) Information about the Ambrosial Acres Series, articles, blog posts, and other literary goodies can be found there as well.

Why did you decide to write “YA” novels?
I’m forty-three, but parts of my soul refuse to grow up. They say, You are what you eat. But I say, You’re as old as you feel. How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing? As for Transgression, Amber, Trent, and Tirzah share a bit of my DNA. They represent a little bit of the teenage Jannette, except for Trent, I’m still a dork like he is. When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms? I was taking online classes through Liberty University, but was swept away during the Twilight craze. My friend had let me borrow the entire book series. I read all the books in a month! It was then when my life took an unexpected turn down the road of literature (right before falling down a rabbit hole). Generally, how long does it take you to write a book? Uh...three years. Pretty long, huh? I’ve never taken creative writing classes, so I devoured books, articles, blog posts, and listened to podcasts, hoping to learn the craft. My perfectionism was to blame for the long time period more than anything, though.

Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?
I use to go with the flow, but I found writing works best for me first thing in the morning.

What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions? 
No, not at all. My husband goes to work early in the morning and our daughter goes to school throughout the week. I have the house all to myself. Well, not all to myself. I have to share it with Alaya--our two year old German Shepherd. Do you feel humour is important in YA and why? But of course! Real life can be tough, daunting. We all have worries and burdens, and humour brightens the day, making it more bearable. Happiness is good for the heart and soul. Everyone can always use a good laugh.

What kind of research do you do?
For Transgression, I had to research trees and flowers. Ambrosial Acres is filled with them. What does your husband/wife/boyfriend/girlfriend think of your writing? My husband is AWESOME! He is super supportive and encouraging, and so is our daughter. I am so blessed to have such a great family. They understand the time and work it takes to research, write stories, rewrite them, edit, and the non-stop commitment of marketing and networking.

 Fill in the blank favorites
- Dessert (Anything chocolate). Season (Fall time). Type of hero (Superman, which is my husband). Type of heroine (Lennox Winters from the Defier Series & Parvin Blackwater from the Out of Time Series).

Do you have a favorite author? Favorite book?
Mandy Fender, Nadine Brandes, and C.S. Lewis.

Where do you see yourself in five years?
Alive and well, I hope. Okay, okay. Hopefully I’ll have more books written and published, making someone’s day a little brighter. :)

 How long have you been writing - have you always wanted to be a writer?
Not until my late thirties.

How many books have you written, how many have been published?
One as of now--Transgression.

What is the hardest part of writing/the easiest for you?
Everything is the hardest part. The first draft is the hardest of them all. To me, rewriting and editing seem easier since the bones of the story have been constructed.

Have you experienced writer's block--->
If so, how did you work through it? Nope. I always have ideas swimming inside my mind.

What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?
Transferring the stories from within and giving them substance with every click of the keyboard.
Whether the author is the only one to read his/her stories, it’s a great accomplishment to be celebrated. Of course, it would be even greater to have at least one more person to share it with.

If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?
Reading more books.

Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
Your dream of becoming a published author will happen if you keep the passion alive for writing, if you commit yourself to writing as often as you can, and if you do what it takes to get your story as polished as it needs to be (deserves to be) no matter how long it takes you to do so. I stress the word “if” because anything is possible, but commitment, perseverance, and continual work are required to see your stories come to life. To hold them in your hand, and hopefully in the hands of others, whether in electronic format or paperback/hardcover.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Guest Blogger: Natalie Silk

Snowfall's Secret by [Silk, Natalie]

https://www.amazon.com/Snowfalls-Secret-Natalie-Silk-ebook/dp/B01KII53EQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1473691354&sr=1-1&keywords=snowfall%27s+secret+by+natalie+silk#nav-subnav



Thanks in advance for reading about me:
My current work is Snowfall’s Secret. It’s a about a girl from another world who must live like any other tween on Earth (and she suffers from amnesia). Of course, she learns to enjoy shopping at the mall with her very own debit card and has a few secrets. At its core is the message that everyone has value and has something special to share.

The story was inspired by a dream I had when I was twelve. I saw five monks standing in a semi-circle. They were all wearing a triangle-shaped pendant with a red stone in the center. One of the monks looked at me and said, “You’re not ready,” and I woke. I had subsequent dreams of a girl with a pendant to the one the monks wore and I wrote them all down.

My favorite character to write about (funny how that turned out) was a secondary one to the story: Mrs. Margot Greenfield. I based her on a favorite childhood teacher.

By the way, my favorite genre to write is science fiction. Surprise! Just kidding.
My focus right now is science fiction for girls; but I’ve also wrote a short science fiction story and I’m still playing around with a short story that’s alternative history to give myself a mental stretch. I have this irrational fear that the last thing I finish writing will be my last. I wonder if I’m not alone.
I’m pretty ‘old school’ when it comes to my writing habits. The first thing I do is buy a brand new hand-sized spiral notebook and use it to write the basic story that’s mostly action punctuated here and there by dialogue. The little notebook helps me believe that I’m accomplishing so much. I then use my trusty laptop to write the second draft that looks as if I threw words down to see what sticks. The technical term I like to use is word hurl. Each subsequent draft looks a little more refined than the previous one. I then use the little spiral notebook to make notes and jot down ideas for the story.
I began writing when I was ten and back then we didn’t have home computers.

I was asked a while ago what I would do if I weren’t a writer; and I quipped that I would be an artist. I dug deep down and realized the truth is that I would be a very sad person without writing. My words are what ground me and keep me sane.

I’ve been asked advice by aspiring writers. I’m very, very flattered. But let me tell you, I’m still an aspiring writer.
 My advice is simple: don’t ever, ever (and I mean ever) give up.

Please reach out to me on:
Facebook Natalie Silk, Author https://www.facebook.com/Natalie-Silk-Author-313822162074307/?fref=ts
Twitter @natalieasilk https://twitter.com/natalieasilk

My website www.nataliesilkauthor.com
Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Natalie-Silk/

Friday, September 9, 2016

Guest Blogger: Henry Anderson




https://www.amazon.com/Mouth-Henry-Anderson/dp/1625264178/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473428244&sr=8-1&keywords=the+mouth+by+henry+anderson


Please tell us about your latest book.
“The Mouth” is a sci fi adventure story about a teenager whose town is burned down and family killed. His only chance of survival is to travel through a dangerous device called “The Mouth” that opens doors into other worlds.


What can we expect from you in the future?
I’m currently writing an urban fantasy about a police officer who uncovers some secrets in a strange town. I’m hoping it might turn into a series.


How do we find out about you and your books?
A good place to start would be my website at https://henryandersonbooks.com
I’m on Twitter at https://twitter.com/handersonbooks and my Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/henry.anderson.books. My Amazpn author page is: http://author.to/henryanderson


Why did you decide to write Science Fiction?
I feel like science fiction/fantasy chose me - in the sense that it interests me. I think speculative fiction can make you look at familiar things differently.


How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?
Quite a lot. I try and smuggle experiences in so it’s not too obvious it’s autobiographical. Life events like recently surviving cancer change you as a person and consequently as a writer.


When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?
They made a “Planet of the Apes” TV show when I was a kid and I was captivated by it. I wrote a story set in that world - I was about eight. I’ve written things on-and-off since then – I had some plays performed. A recent health scare spurred me into action. My first novel submission was to Solstice Publishing a few months ago.


Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?
I go with the flow. I take my trusty laptop with me wherever I go. I spend an unhealthy amount of time in coffee shops. I have a very low minimum word count. Some days it comes easier than others.


What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?
I took up archery a couple of years ago which makes a change from writing. I read a lot. Also I listen to audiobooks a lot.


What truly motivates you in general? In your writing?
Anger and fear. And love.


Where do your ideas come from?
I wish I knew. Somewhere in a primitive part of my brain.


Do you feel humour is important in science fiction and why?
Humour is definitely an important part of storytelling. I tend to write darkly humorous situations if not out-and-out comedy.


What kind of research do you do?
I have always enjoyed going into libraries, so I still do that a bit. The Internet is a massive resource. But, being honest, I do as little research as I can get away with.


Tell us about yourself
I’m an English graduate and former journalist. I live in a village in Kent. I like painting in oils and writing.


Do you have a favorite author? Favorite book?
The author I most enjoy reading is P.G. Wodehouse. His prose brightens up any day. Evelyn Waugh said: “The gardens of Blandings Castle are that original garden from which we are all exiled.”
My favourite book is probably “Kidnapped” by Robert Louis Stevenson. I like adventure stories and it’s a masterpiece.


How many books have you written, how many have been published?
I’ve written a few short stories and plays. This is the first novel. I’m very excited Solstice is publishing it.


After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever buy it or read it?
I think Leonardo da Vinci said : “"Art is never finished, only abandoned." Eventually you have to abandon it somewhere and drive off.


Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting?
I usually think of a setting first – to test the characters.


What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?
The thought that someone might actually read your stuff is pretty amazing.


Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
On bad days any writer feels despair that what they are doing might be worthless. Ignore those feelings and keep writing. Write. Write as if your life depended on it!

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Guest Blogger: Som Nandivada

Coming Soon!



Please tell us about your latest book.
The title is State/Craft: Vision of the Seeker. It is an epic science fiction book, set in the far future. It spans across a sizeable portion of the universe. There is an empire whose domain includes millions of planets, and trillions of living beings. In the universe of this story, there are other non-empire worlds as well. The eternal tale of the fight between good and evil plays out in this context. As a backdrop to this, there is a Hard SF layer (denoted as The Book of Light for Humans in the context of State/Craft) that is referenced throughout the book, wherein there are detailed references such as chronology protection, that apply to concepts such as time travel. My web site has a link to The Book of Light for Humans.

What can we expect from you in the future?
I am currently working on another book, which also builds on the elements of the State/Craft universe. While this next one does have some shared contexts with Vision of the Seeker, the characters are different to the most part, with just some glancing overlaps.

Vision of the Seeker starts out at a remote asteroid in the solar system about a thousand or so years in the future, and from there, pretty much immediately the story moves out to utterly exotic and fantastic settings in the far future and millions of light years away. In contrast, the next book I’m working on is set about a hundred years or so in the future and much of the plot unravels in California, both in the US and in Mexico. Hence, while it still taps into the State/Craft universe and all the fantastic elements from there, it is way more familiar and relatable in terms of contexts since it is only a few decades away from our current reality, just around the corner essentially. Just think of California in the 22nd Century, and the possibilities!

The concepts of time travel which I am developing in these stories are based on current science, such as Einstein’s relativity theory leading on up to Stephen Hawking’s work on quantum gravity. I expect to release multiple books in the State/Craft series, which will all build on the structure, the key to it all being The Book of Light for Humans.



How do we find out about you and your books?
My information is as below:
Web Site: www.trihalya.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/razorstropper
Twitter:
@somnandivada
Blog: www.trihalya.blogspot.com


Why did you decide to write science fiction novels?
My educational background is physics and mathematics. Complementary to that, my primary animus is right brain oriented, creative. Hence, science fiction is a natural domain for me to evolve in.
I am also a songwriter / drummer (classic rock / blues), and the songs I have written are accessible via my social media links. My lyrics tend to gravitate towards a darker edge, whereas my science fiction work is tech focused with a lesser touch of dread and carrying more of a renaissance spirit, or at least I’d like to think so!

Thus, science fiction in conjunction with songwriting helps me achieve inner balance.

How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?
Every writer and every artist bestows their personality and character to whatever they create, and I am no exception to that. My background and experiences definitely play into what I write. That said, the focus in my books is far-future science fiction, therefore my personal experiences are at most indirect influences rather than immediately noticeable references.

When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?
I can’t quite trace back to the seed thoughts, but I can remember writing with intent to publish in some way, and the process of generating written works from raw material to finished goods from back while I was in elementary school. Not that any of it made it anywhere other than the recycle bin for a long whileJ. I can recollect my first official submission to a national magazine when I was in Grade 8, never heard back from them of course.

Generally, how long does it take you to write a book?
I would project it at a year or so - give or take a few months.

Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?
Go with the flow.

What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions?
My family supports me to the hilt. My father believed in me ever since I was a kid and encouraged my trial-and-error attempts at various creative efforts even though it was frowned upon by various ‘village elders’ who expected every kid to conform to established societal patterns. My wife made the conscious decision to scale and ramp down her career to allow me the room to ‘moonlight and/or moonshine’ along on my creative directions in parallel to my day job. She also takes care of all the routine aspects of life whether it is the administrative matters such as banking and tax filing et cetera, or the operational activities such as the handy work and maintenance and stuff. This gives me room and freedom in the mind. My kids support and inspire my efforts as well. I am truly blessed in this respect.

What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?
I take the dog for long walks into the woods, along the trails. Adjacent to my house is a pathway that connects into the Trans Canada Trail, via the Bruce Trail. Not that I’ve gone in real deep as yet, but the adjacency of the wilderness provides me with the umbilical recharge.

What truly motivates you in general? In your writing?
Conatus drives me.

Where do your ideas come from?
In IT terms, data definition and data manipulation occurs and sustains in my head throughout, all the time, any given time. On top of that, I capture snippets of thoughts, concepts, notions et al whenever and wherever they occur. Further to that, database reorganization kicks in every now and then. That is to say, when I get large enough chunks of time, I sit down and process all such snippets into a narrative and/or a song, or whatever other form might evolve from there.

Do you feel humour is important in science fiction and why?
Of course, humor matters for science fiction in the same way as how it does for any other genre of fiction. When the readers laugh along with you, they connect with your story and become invested in it.

What kind of research do you do?
Every input received in life is a research stream. I have learnt much as an academia fringe dweller and on the road alongside of Kerouac et al, to name just a couple of the streams. Research takes new shape each day.

Would you like to write a different genre than you do now, or sub-genre?
Psychological Thrillers would be nice …


What does your wife think of your writing?
She is not much into Science Fiction, but she believes in me.

Do you ever ask her for advice?
For areas where her strengths are, yes of course.

Please tell us about yourself (family, hobbies, education, etc.)
My childhood occurred in multiple locations all over India, but my roots are from Southern India. My hometown is Hyderabad which is where I spent much of my time growing up (my ancestry is from a nearby fertile coastal region). When I was a kid I used to have hobbies such as philately and
numismatics. These days, my energies are fully allocated between my day job and the passions that I pursue, so no room left for hobbies, but who knows what tomorrow holds! My educational background is MSc Mathematics with minor credits in Physics and Space Studies.

Do you have a favorite author? Favorite book?

There are so many! I have lived through books, during the formative years of my life. During those days I used to voraciously plow through whatever came my way, from Thucydides and Herodotus, to pulp, to African to Latin American und so Weiter. I overdid it, basically.
Then, as I was approaching my thirties, I had a bout of withdrawal (on account of the prior overdose), and read pretty much nothing at all for more than a decade or so from then on.
Recently I have re-commenced reading but it is a rough restart. I am finding it hard to get in the moment, with most of what I try, whether new material or re-reads. The one book I would vouch for as having grabbed me back onto the other side of the Proscenium Arch - is Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig. I have been on two road trips through Montana and vicinities, in the years between the first time I read it and the second time. And it is a continuum, the experience from the first read of Pirsig’s book, the actual feel of the road when I was there in person, and the second read. In fact, one of my characters in my next book is from Montana; the region has touched me deeply.

Who are some of your other favorite authors to read?
For Science Fiction and associated domains, I would cite Arthur C Clarke, Isaac Asimov, and Douglas Adams. If you ask me the same thing tomorrow I might have a slightly different mix, a different answer possibly. But right at this moment, these gentlemen come to mind.

Where do you see yourself in five years?
Doing road shows, talk shows etc. and negotiating with Hollywood for my books.
It may sound audacious, considering that I am a novice writer and still have a long way to go even in terms of acquiring the necessary storytelling and writing skills. But with that said, what I have faith in, is in the structure of The Book of Light for Humans which underpins all my State/Craft books, starting with Vision of the Seeker. The Book of Light for Humans will be a game changer. The scientific premises contained therein for which I have started to put a storytelling structure around, are deeply connected to and inextricably intertwined with the core fabric of human destiny. It will drive itself. It is just a matter of time.

How many books have you written, how many have been published?
I have released a couple of self-published books in the past but I myself would totally discount them off as trial-and-error efforts. State/Craft: Vision of the Seeker with Solstice Publishing is my first well rounded book.

After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever buy it and/or read it?
For the books under the State/Craft aegis, starting with Vision of the Seeker, I definitely intend to do so, since the overall property is meant to grow from the initial seeds. Reading and re-reading will be very much a part of the process.

Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting?
The first thing that emerges for me is a world view of the story which includes prototype frames of both settings as well as characters. Gradually that distils its way towards draft takes of the book in its entirety.

What is the hardest part of writing/the easiest for you?
Research is easy. Evolving relatable characters is hard.
Finding epic arcs in storytelling is easy, and defining skeletal structures for the arcs is easy as well. Bestowing flesh and blood to the narratives that build up the arcs is hard, but improving that skill is an aspirational goal so hopefully the next time you ask me this, the answer will be better!
Showing is hard and telling is easy, but again this is a key skill which all writers including me continue to learn all the way along.

Have you experienced writer's block---> If so, how did you work through it?
Yes. When it occurs, I switch focus to a different activity, and come back to writing when I feel the juices flowing again.

What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?
For us earth based living beings, fathers play a subordinate role for childbirth, riding shotgun at the side of the mother. Creative efforts such as writing give us males a chance at experiencing that joy of being in the driving seat for works of creation.

If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?
I will quote a poem by Mirza Ghalib in this context:

Na tha kuchch to KHuda tha, kuchch na hota to KHuda hota
Duboya mujhko hone ne, na hota maiN to kya hota ?
Rough translation:
Were there to be Nothing; there yet would be God.
Were Nothing to ever be, there would yet be God.
That said, Here I am drowned in Being ... so what of it, were I not to be?

Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
Keep at it, and keep improving your skill by being responsive to critiques and feedbacks. One fine day the door just opens.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016


                                                  Click for Options 




Click for Options

 https://www.amazon.com/Forgetting-Jane-CJ-Warrant-ebook/dp/B01G28ULXE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1473262558&sr=1-1&keywords=cj+warrant




Hey Everyone,
I’m glad to be here on Lizzy Steven’s Blog today and tell you a little bit of myself.
I’m a wife, a mother of three and retired from the beauty business of 30 years. Aside from hair, writing is my other passion.

I have to be honest, when I started out in my serious writing endeavor seven years ago, I had no clue what type of writer I’d become, what was voice I develop, or what a pantser or plotter was? Seriously, I was clueless.

However, I’ve learned from classes, talking with other writers, and just plain wrote, wrote and wrote, in which I came to understand who I am as a writer and what genre I write.
Here are some questions readers would like to know about me.

Generally, how long does it take you to write a book?
I’m a slow writer, but I’m getting faster. So about 6 months.

What can we expect from you in the future? 
Currently, I have two stories I’m editing, both Dark Romantic thrillers and Contemporary duet.


Do you have a favorite author? Favorite books?
I have several that I can’t choose one. T.M. Frasier, Kristen Ashley, Shayla Black and Lexi Blake… I have to say to date, my favorite book is more like a series, because tells a full story about this character that I can’t divide them is King by T.M. Frasier.


If you weren't writing, what would you be doing?
I read, listen to audio books, bake, take care of household and family, but for myself—during my down time, I read a lot.


Now, after several years, I finally published my first book. Forgetting Jane, which is a dark paranormal romantic thriller based out of a small town in Wisconsin, where a woman was found brutalized and buried, only to survive. The chief of police will do anything to keep her safe from the killer who’s out to get her, even protect his heart from falling in love while discovering the gruesome truth about the killer’s past.

Check out Forgetting Jane’s trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTpro3NhdJI You can find Forgetting Jane https://amzn.com/B01G28ULXE
You can find me @ cjwarrant.com
And all social media:
www.facebook.com/cjwarrantauthor
www.twitter.com/cjwarrant
www.instagram.com/cjwarant
www.pinterest.com/cjwarrant https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CjWarrant


Thanks again for joining me, and thank you, Lizzy Steven for letting me be a part of your wonderful blog.

Smooches,
CJ

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Guest Blogger: Vivienne Vincent

Dandelions by [Vincent, Vivienne]

https://www.amazon.com/Dandelions-Vivienne-Vincent-ebook/dp/B01IG97RCU/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1473163073&sr=1-1&keywords=Vivienne+Vincent

1. Please tell us about your latest book.
Dandelions is contemporary romance. It's a story of second chances. It doesn't portray anyone as a perfect deity but talks about flawed humans who are willing to improve themselves for the sake of their loved ones.
    2. What can we expect from you in the future?
    Right now, I only have one new story which I haven't even started writing. It's a friends to lovers romance which sounds somewhat cliché. But I think that all stories have been told. What's important is how they are told.

    3. How do we find out about you and your books?
    Dandelions is available on Amazon.
And you can find me on my Facebook author page.
And on Twitter - viviennevincen8

    4. Why did you decide to write romance novels?
    I call Dandelions a product of four years of unemployment. I was a total pantser too which made editing a real challenge. I was very fortunate to have Debbie Rowe, the editor of Dandelions, who helped me a lot. That's why I say that Dandelions is as much hers as it is mine.

    5. How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?
    It's hard to tell when you're writing fiction. Stories are mostly made up but they remain a reflection of who we are and how we perceive this world and those around us. People who know me have told me that Dandelions sounds like me. That is has a dark and eerie quality. But I cannot comment because it's very difficult to distance yourself from your own writing.

    6. When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?
    My husband encouraged me to try and get published.

    7. Generally, how long does it take you to write a book?
    Once I start writing, the first draft doesn't take very long. The problem is to start and then stick to it. Writing demands patience and persistence. It's not always fun. The process can be extremely frustrating as well. With Dandelions, editing took much longer than writing the book did. I hope I'll learn from my mistakes and make things easier for my editor in the future.

    8. What is your writing routine once you start a book?
    Dandelions was written at night, all of it. But for my next book I want to have a proper schedule and work during the day; mostly in the afternoon.

    9. What about your family, do they know not to bother you when you are writing - or are there constant interruptions?
    Constant interruptions. I can only write while my husband is at work or asleep.

    10. What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?
    I leave the house and go to a coffee shop by myself. I sit there for hours either reading or simply staring at the table. If it's a sunny day, I go out and sit in a park. Sometimes I spend time with friends and family which helps a lot.

    11. What truly motivates you in general? In your writing?
    I call writing a form of Freudian analysis. It just makes me feel better.

    12. Where do your ideas come from?
    They just pop up at random moments. It happens a lot when I'm ironing or working out.

    13. Do you feel humour is important in romance and why?
    Not necessarily. It depends on the story and the situation. I've seen writers who write very funny stuff but some of their work is extremely serious and I cannot say that one is better than the other.

    14 What are your thoughts on love scenes in romance novels, do you find them difficult to write?
    Extremely difficult. After Dandelions, I have a newfound respect for writers who can describe those scenes and experiences.

    15. What kind of research do you do?
    I use the internet. But I prefer talking to people one-on-one. It's very helpful talking to those who are willing to share their experiences and opinions honestly.

    16. Would you like to write a different genre than you do now, or sub-genre?
    I think I'd like to stick to romance.

    17. What does your husband think of your writing?
    I don't think he cares much. He's just glad that it keeps me busy.

    18. Do you ever ask him for advice?
    I do but I rarely get an answer. I do ask his brother and friends though and they try to be helpful.
19. Fill in the blank favorites -
a. Season - Summer
b. Type of hero – Flawed humans willing to improve themselves.

    20. Where do you see yourself in five years?
    I hope I'll be done with my second book and the third one will be in progress. Oh, and I hope I'll be able to find a steady job.

    21. Have you always wanted to be a writer?
    No, not really.

    22. How many books have you written, how many have been published?
    So far I have one novella; Dandelions.

    23. After you've written your book and it's been published, do you ever read it?
    Whenever I receive constructive criticism, and I mean constructive not meaningless, vindictive, and destructive, I go through the book so that I can avoid those mistakes in the future.

    24. Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting?
    I think all of them come at the same time. I don't know about others but I cannot separate one from the other.

    25. What is the hardest part of writing / the easiest for you?
    Nothing about writing is easy for me.

    26. Have you experienced writer's block---> If so, how did you work through it?
    For me, the hardest part is coming up with the idea for a book. Developing those ideas is also difficult but first you have to have some kind of foundation. But of course, even when you're writing you have a lot of problems. You plan to write a certain kind of story but end up writing a different one. When I was working on Dandelions, there came a point where I was completely stuck. So, What I did was that I started scribbling different scenarios and then picked the one I thought would work.

    27. What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?
    I think that you get to know yourself in ways you never imagined possible. You look at your work and wonder, did I write this? It's a strange experience that something's right inside of you and you're completely unaware of it.

    28. Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
    Someone told me that your twelfth book is where you really start. So be patient, be persistent, and most of all, be yourself.