Tuesday, January 31, 2012

To Tip or Not To Tip?

Hi Everyone,

Today's blog is about tipping at a restaraunt. Do you leave a tip?

The standard tip is 15% So basically if you spend $100 you owe another $15 to the waitor/waitress for bringing you your food and drink that you are already paying for.

For me I always leave a tip and I always leave the standard 15%. I'm one of those people who have to get out my calculator and figure it just to make sure I'm not cheating them. LOL.


But really it's not fair to the customer. The restaraunt owner should pay their staff a fair wage and then that wouldn't be put off on the customer.

For example:
At my favorite steak house that I go to all the time. One of my kids gets off the kids menu and his plate is $5.99 and my other kid gets his off the regular menu but he gets a small steak and potato and his food is $9.99 so together their food comes to approx. $16

With appatizer, salads, drinks our bill comes to about $75 and my tip comes to approx. $12 So my tip will almost pay for both of my kids to eat. AND I am already paying the restaraunt $75 to eat there.


So although I always pay the tip and plan to keep eating at my favorite restaruant LOL I don't see the fairness in that cost being put off on the customer. I think the restaraunt should pay the staff a proper wage.

What are your thoughts?

17 comments:

  1. I couldn't agree more. The only time I won't leave a tip is when the service by the waitress is terrible, but that doesn't happen very often.

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    1. I know what you are talking about. I have been places when the service was just horrible and I felt like I was making them mad having to take my order LOL. But my favorite restaraunt isn't like that. The staff is awesome there and the food is almost always cooked perfectly.

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  2. We have a restaurant that serves the general public, and the prices are a bit higher than others of the same quality. The waitresses are paid their wage plus when the customer kicks in the tip too, it is just enough to be able to go on those cruises twice a year. I'm not making this up.

    That's all these waitresses talk about, and they are always making their cruise plans in the restaurant in the hearing of the customers. With the FAIR tipping, they are able to live a bit higher than most of the patrons. I just wish they would keep their good fortunes to themselves. I actually feel guilty tipping them.

    My wife said to me regarding hairdressers too. She used to be one and they got pennies for the hard work they did earlier, but times they are a changin' they say.

    Where eagles fly,
    Don

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    1. Oh Yes. Hairdressers. I always tip mine too. They don't make nearly enough money. The standard around my area is about $10- $15 for a hair cut and it takes a good while to get a hair cut with the hairdresser standing the entire time with their arms stretched out cutting. I don't know how they do it. My arms would fall off LOL

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    2. I am a hairdresser and yeah, the arms do fall lol. But most places pay on a scale. For instance, with my work hours and such I may make $200 a week. I MAY get half IF I earned that 200. But to earn it, I would have to do $400 in hair sales. Like Lizzy said...at 15 bucks a pop and in this economy, it isn't easy. But if I'm lucky and do hit the 200 well after taxes I bring home about $120 a week or 480 a month. Those aren't my real numbers just an example. In my last job I did have a number of 17.50 an hr quota. Two haircuts an hour. Doesn't leave much room for spedning money, does it? So basically from someone who needs those tips to pay for gas, I agree that employers should just pay more. Many people don't tip waiters who make $2.75 here. Plus when my sister worked at a big name steak house, they had to give a percentage to the bartender and bus boy. Both already make above minimum yet they still get some of the tips. Around my area a lot of places do this. Not fair at all!

      Moral of. The story:TIP! Lol

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  3. While I do agree it does seem sort of unfair to the customer, it boils down, in my opinion, to a couple of factors: you are essentially "buying" better service (yes, there's a debate to this but that's essentially the idea) and second, you're keeping your favorite restaurant open. Most restaurants would not last long if they had to pay all their staff a competitive wage.

    There's several reasons for that. First, if there's no customers, there's no money being made. Second, because the custom is to tip a percentage of the bill, wait staff are inclined to upsell to their tables. Not only that, they are more likely to be more pleasant which, in turn, encourages you, the customer, to come back.

    If it's any help, often times the wait staff also tips out the bus boy, etc.

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    1. Very true, and since I love my favorite restaraunt I won't be stopping any time soon. LOL Plus they seem to know how to hire because I've never had bad service there. They have always served us well and refilled our drinks and what I love is that they treat my kids like people. You know some people just hate to wait on kids but they are always patient and let my kids do their ordering theirselves which they love to do LOL

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  4. I waited tables when I was in college, and the fact it was tipped was important to me because management would pretty much let me work as many hours I needed. So I am somewhat partial to the system, but there is a (strange) logic behind it.

    Good waiters/waitresses learn to hone in on what the patron wants. Some love the banter, and others just want a relaxing experience. Children are part of the patrons, so making sure they are enjoying it too is, IMO, part of the job.

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  5. Guess what? If tipping wasn't an option, then you'd be paying $87 for your $75 meal. You wouldn't have a choice of a lower tip for bad service or a higher tip for superior service.

    I do wish wait people received a fair wage, but they're generally paid minimum wage, so tips are essential for them to live.

    Not sure about those waiters talking about their cruises paid by tips. Perhaps the restaurant where they work is affiliated with a cruise line which gives them an employee discount.

    Another thing to consider is that the wait staff may also be required to give a percentage of their tips to the non-service staff. And they also have to pay taxes on tips which is calculated as an average for the type of restaurant. If they receive less than the average, then they're paying taxes for money they never got.

    I've found that people who've never worked in food service are more likely to stiff the wait staff than those who have.

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    1. I agree. I never worked as a waitress but I was cook in a small diner when I was younger. I flipped burgers and made eggs for breakfast. Working in the food industry is definately not easy work. I was only paid $5 hour when minimum was $5.50 and I didn't get any tips. And the servers didn't have to split theirs. But I was happy to have a job so I took the $5 LOL

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  6. Generally I'm a big tipper. If service is bad due to the restaurant being super busy and short on wait staff, I still tip. If service is bad and the restaurant is not busy I don't tip. I always tip the hairdresser. I feel the more I give to others...the more blessed I am.

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    1. I'm kind of like you if the service is really bad then I don't want to leave a super good tip So I usually just leave $2 or something small. :)

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  7. I usually do the 20%. 2 of my 3 kids have, at one time or another, worked where tips are part of the jobs, so tipping is just something that is expected. My x husband had a bar and was short help and asked me to help out...soooo being the wonderful person I am, I went right over and cocktailed for the evening. One table had several 21 year olds and at the end of the evening they forked up some money for a tip. I said, "Really? Big spenders - this is it!" Well, they forked up some more and surprisingly enough, I was never asked back. Go figure!

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    1. LOL. Yes I can't imagine that you would be asked back LOL Too Funny :)

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  8. Had to throw my two cents in on this one. I live in a beautiful (and quite expensive) coastal Southern California city and food/bevvies are a BIG thing here. New eateries, bistros, coffee houses (not "shops", but "houses"), micro-breweries, farmer's markets-that-also-serve-food, gastropubs, etc. opening every freakin' minute. Which is fabulous for a foodie freak like me--my husband and I have spent the last three years sampling from as many of these places as we can, and in the process we have made many friends--some of them who have become our best friends--of those who work at these establishments.

    I can tell you now that, like Erika our hairdresser, these fine and hard-working folks depend on their tips to survive. And depending on where they work, they can make either a killing or barely enough to live on. In my circle of crazy mates, I know bartenders who make $5,000 a month (NO JOKE), all on tips. Our minimum wage is $8.00/hr (except in San Francisco, where it is $9.92, which just shows you how expensive basic living in San Fran is) and NO ONE can survive on that in coastal California, where average rent on a 1 bedroom apartment is $900 to $1,200/mo depending on location. Without tips, none of these employees could afford pay their rent, much less afford food, utilities, car payments, insurance, healthcare (many have no benefits), etc. I have one friend who is a server and she makes a measly $400/month because her employer "skims" off her tips. Thank God she lives with her mom--if she didn't she'd be on the street.

    I understand that we can get some pretty crappy service at times, and in those cases, I get that you would question whether or not you should tip. But the way I see it, tipping is part of the experience of dining out. If your service was poor, still give a tip--at least a few bucks, as Lizzy illustrated--and ask to speak to their manager. If you don't think the server did poorly enough to complain to management about them, then you probably have no reason to bitch about giving a tip to them. Remember: serving is a tough job. You work crappy hours for minimum wage, oftentimes with customers who expect you to kiss their feet, even if it's at Denny's.

    My husband and I were broke for YEARS, especially when he was in law school and could not even work part time. When those times rolled around, we would avoid going out. If you cannot afford to tip, don't go out period, or pick up a bag of Jack-In-The-Box tacos, where you don't have to leave a tip.

    Just my thoughts. :-)

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  9. Oh, I totally missed the mark on this...the question was about paying a fair wage to servers/bar staff.

    I agree with the sentiment that many eateries could not stay open if they had to pay their staffs $60k/year (or whatever a "higher" wage would be). Tipping makes sense on that end of things.

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  10. I always leave a big tip, but when a waiter is rude or I get bad service, my tips are always lower. Nothing beats politeness and good service.

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